18 Jun 2020

Animal Health Legislation

The TSE Regulation and the Animal By-Product (ABP) Regulations prevent the use of most animal proteins in feed for food-producing animals. Defra/ the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) have produced detailed guidance notes on both the TSE and ABP Regulations and these clarify which animal proteins are permitted to be fed and to which class of livestock.

Regulation 999/2001 laying down rules for the prevention, control and eradication of certain transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

See Regulation 999/2001 laying down rules for the prevention, control and eradication of certain transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

This Regulation applies to the production and placing on the market of live animals and products of animal origin and in certain specific cases to exports.

The TSE Regulation and the Animal By-Product (ABP) Regulation (see below) prevent the use of most animal proteins in feed for  food-producing animals. The AHPA has produced guidance notes on both the TSE and ABP Regulations and these clarify which animal proteins are permitted to be fed and to which class of livestock.

To facilitate compliance with the TSE Regulation, the APHA has produced a detailed guidance note on the TSE regulations, which is available here. (Please note that the guidance note on the TSE Regulation is the last set of guidance on this APHA site.)

Associated legislation

Regulation 999/2001 is implemented, in England, by the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (England) Regulations 2010 (SI 2010 No.801) (as amended by The Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2013 (SI 2013 No. 336). Separate but parallel legislation is in operation in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Regulation 1069/2009 laying down health rules as regards animal by-products and derived products not intended for human consumption

See Regulation 1069/2009 laying down health rules as regards animal by-products and derived products not intended for human consumption

Animal by-products (ABPs) are animal carcasses, parts of carcasses or products of animal origin that are not intended for human consumption.

These include:

  • catering waste 
  • used cooking oil 
  • foodstuffs no longer intended for human consumption containing products of animal origin.

The ABP Regulation:

  • bans the use of catering waste in animal feed; 
  • prevents as a principle the intra-species recycling of processed animal proteins (PAP) i.e. the feeding back of PAP to animals of the same species; 
  • lays down the processing requirements for certain ABPs, which can be used for farm animal feed, such as fishmeal for non-ruminant animals.

Commission Regulation 142/2011 lays down detailed implementation rules for Regulation (EC) No 1069/2009 on health rules as regards animal by-products and derived products not intended for human consumption and implementing Council Directive 97/78/EC as regards certain samples and items exempt from veterinary checks at the border under that Directive.

To facilitate compliance with the ABP Regulation, the APHA has produced detailed guidance which is available here. This includes a detailed guide on supplying and using animal by-products as farm animal feed.

Regulation 1069/2009 and Commission Regulation 142/2011 are enforced, in England, through the Animal By-Products (Enforcement) (England) Regulations 2013 (SI 2013 No. 2952). Separate but parallel legislation applies in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. 

Defra Consolidated Organic Regulation April 2016